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Good wins

June 9, 2013 Leave a comment

Do you follow George Takei on Facebook or Twitter? Who knew Sulu had such a humor? Or that George had such a background? He was one of many in the shameful Japanese Internment camps in the USA during World War II. In fact, the play Allegiance is based on the internment camps (not about George but the he is in it).

A recent post on George’s Facebook was in honor of  Bob Fletcher who was one of the many unsung heroes of the time. He saved some of the farms that were being snatched from the rightful owners during this dark period of USA history.

Another beautiful person is Clara Breed, a San Diego Children’s librarian. I read the very extraordinary collection of letters, Dear Miss Breed, some years ago. Now you can view and read the some of the letters online from the Japanese American National Museum. She worked hard to get books and materials and just plain ol’love and acceptance to the kids in those camps. She also worked to get them out of the camps.

Love trumps hate. There will always be people working to right wrongs, helping those in need, protesting against injustice. And yes, there will be people creating the wrongs, ignoring the needs, and encouraging injustice. But in the end, good does triumph over evil. Always.

Categories: books, librarian

Shhh, habitual reading

June 6, 2013 Leave a comment

Oh Laurel, you always make me think! With Reading Habits of Professionals, you did it again.  I love to see people reading – reading anything at all. Even if I don’t like that author or genre or series, the person is reading. You can’t judge a book by its cover. You can’t judge a reader by the reading.

I do not exactly hide my books or reading materials but…well, they are not in full view to the casual visitor. I’m not ashamed of my reading, I rather like my mysteries and occasional Sci-Fi and Fantasy. I’ve been known to indulge in romance and dip my reading glasses into non-fiction areas too. I just don’t have any bookcases in “public” areas of the abode.

When I fancied I might actually write books, I collected a lovely set of reference materials. My family may have been a bit concerned about the “how to” books on poison, guns, and other disposal methodology. I joyfully recall the look on the face of the clerk at the bookstore as I piled up the Big Stack of Potential Mayhem with big grin and hand full of cash; I often wonder if his call to the FBI was taken seriously.

Keep on reading. Romance. Urban Fantasy. Western. Biography. Cookery. Heavy tomes of desert dry text. Read it. Enjoy it. Flaunt it.

Speaking of books…

October 20, 2011 Leave a comment

Have you heard of  Book Reviewers?  No, not the ones who write for Publisher’s Weekly or Booklist. Book reviewers who go to community centers or libraries and speak about a book.  It’s sort of a cliff notes version of a book club – that is, a book club that reads books. Remember those?

Apparently this has been around for a while in community centers and some public libraries.  I had never heard of it until I met one, a book reviewer/speaker who runs Novel Chatter. She contracts with various groups to go in and speak about a book. She offers several different books (fiction, non-fiction, etc.) to the group and tries to tailor the talk to the group. She also reviews books on her website.

I want that gig. I do. I could totally do it. Or so I think.  I mean, being a librarian I read all the time (haha, librarians out there – that joke is for you!) and I do love to talk (and this one is for the catalogers) so I would be a natural! Seriously though, I think this could be fun but is likely more work than I am anticipating.  A good reviewer/speaker will relate the book to the time period, other books/movies and do a deeper analysis of the material. This means I’d have to do homework and not just read the book. Hmm. I’d probably have to go seek the speaking gigs too. And be “proactive” in selling it. Hmm. Maybe not for me after all.

What other fantastic jobs are out there just waiting to be discovered? Maybe Mike Rowe  could start a show on fun ways ways people make a living (creating crossword puzzles, taste testing ice cream, and reviewing/speaking of books).

Supporting cast: Lady Librarian!

April 19, 2011 2 comments

Have you ever seen the old Perry Mason series? The original black and white episodes with Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale, and William Hopper?  I was home with a broken limb over the holidays, started watching and quickly was addicted.  Since then I have DVR’d the episodes to watch as I work out in the morning.  Older shows are perfect for the morning work out since they lasted longer – episodes were 49 to 52 minutes each, leaving only 8 to 11 minutes for commercials (new shows today last only 40 to 46 minutes for the hour slot). Besides, it is rather fun to spot-the-future-star (Burt Reynolds, Barbara Eden, James Coburn)!

Anyway, back to Perry! The episode was The Case of the Bogus Books from September 27, 1962. That’s nearly 50 years ago.

The plot centered around, of course, a murder. Who was murdered? A nefarious book seller! Why nefarious? He had a successful venture stealing rare first editions from libraries and resell them!  Just listening and watching the “Lady Librarian” (honest, that was how she was billed in the credits) and the Curator (not billed as “Male Curator” but just “Curator”) was both illuminating and strangely familiar.  They discovered several libraries were missing the rare first editions of books – replaced by “worthless” third and fourth editions.  Turns out the … oh wait, you probably want to watch it. I ought not ruin it for you.

I do love it when I find my profession in old movies, books, TV shows, etc. I like seeing how each generation viewed us. How the authors twist and turn our profession! Seeing this makes me think, did the stereotype come from popular culture or did popular culture reflect reality of the time? Regardless, it is rather nice to be thought of as very smart, very organized, and often, very sexy (I could live without the shhh thing though).

Categories: books, humor Tags: , ,

what was lost, is found

March 24, 2011 Leave a comment

Technology can be marvelous. If this works as demo’d … oh boy!

Ever “lose” a book in the shelves? Ever have a shelver come to you to ask where a book is – because You are the Cataloger and Keeper Of All Knowledge of Where Books Live, then be disappointed because you cannot magically make the misshelved book appear? Well fret no more! The Augmented Reality App for Shelf Reading, developed by Miami University Augmented Reality Research Group is here!

Watch the Youtube piece, then if you going to be at ACRL Saturday, April 2, 2011, please go to The Library’s Swiss-Army Knife: Using Smart Phones For Information Discovery, Content Delivery, and Inventory Management session at 9:45 AM in room 201 B/C.

My little cataloger heart is going thump thump thump! Finally, something that ensures all the stuff is in the right place on the shelf!  It also gives me an inventory of what is physically on the shelf! BONUS! I think the shelf readers might actually enjoy doing shelf reading with this fun tool – it’s almost a game.

Categories: books, shelf reading Tags: ,

e-Book sales, hype and reality

October 6, 2010 3 comments

The extremely talented author*, Lucy A. Snyder, has written a very interesting article for Horror World “More on Amazon Rank Tracking and Ebook Sales“. She has links within the article to previous articles on the same subject.

This is the first article I’ve seen from an author with actual analytics of the ‘success’ of the e-books.  Lucy, a conscientious and thorough researcher, details her sales from Amazon on e-books. I urge you to go read it.

This fascinates me. I’ve been wondering who is buying all the e-books (other than libraries) since I hear how incredibly successful they are and how THEY WILL TAKE OVER THE WORLD.  I do like e-books. I was a hard convert – it wasn’t until I got the iPhone and downloaded some free books from Gutenberg Press that I realized how lovely these books can be.  I still prefer a paper version for reading but was overjoyed to have a book at my fingertips wherever I find myself in need (long line? waiting for your friend to join you at lunch? Open the e-book reader and enjoy!).

I knew there was spin in the marketing but these numbers flabbergasted me. “If you said it is so, it will be so” seems to be the mantra. I’m really not that much of a Luddite, I think e-books are waving us into the future. I think the ‘green’ nature of them (as well as the portability) will help on the road to success but I just don’t think we’re there yet.  Again, I have to go back to $$$$. Not everyone has the $$$ to get a e-book reader. Not everyone has the $$$ to get any sort of electronic device to read e-books. Not everyone …well, you’ve heard that rant before.

Lucy’s final paragraph eloquently states my feeling:

So, bibliophiles can put down their Xanax prescriptions; everything’s fine. Ebooks aren’t crowding out the “real” books … they’re just giving readers a delightful variety of options.  And that’s a beautiful thing.

*disclosure, Lucy and I have been friends since college but I do not use hyperbole to describe her. She is extremely talented, dedicated, and darned nice too. Oh and she’d be a great librarian – she has several cats already (oh come on! Stereotypes exist to mock).

Categories: books, e-books Tags: ,

Star-struck

July 2, 2010 2 comments

Last week I attended ALA in Washington, DC. I attended the RDA 101 Pre-conference and several other cataloger-type sessions.  More on those later, but first-

Star struck. I totally geeked out on the exhibit floor.  Can you be star-struck meeting authors?

As you might note from this blog, I am fairly articulate. Generally I present well and speak even better. Apparently this is not true when I meet authors (exception being those I Knew Before Publishing such as the very wonderful Lucy A. Snyder and her husband Gary Braunbeck…although in fairness Gary was already Very Published and Award Winning when I met him but since I met him as the hubby-to-be of my friend, I guess it didn’t affect me as much).

Back to the exhibit hall. Philippe Cousteau (yes, the grandson of Jacques) was to do a signing in a booth. I thought I’d missed his signing and rushed up to the table to see if they had any leftover books.  As I blurted out my request to see if any books were available, the kind lady at the booth pointed out that I was standing next to Him and handed me the very last book they had. He turned to me as I stood mouth agape, took the book and signed it. I spluttered out “wow” and “thank you” and “wow” and “really?” and “wow” several times.  I then walked away in a daze, grasping my prize. I’m certain I will live on in his memory as “crazy librarian”. C’est la vie.

You’d think I would have calmed down after that. You’d be wrong. Soon after I discovered Sisters in Crime had a booth. Several quite wonderful mystery writers were there signing books. Again I went into OMG mode. Thankfully the very nice writers talked me down and I was eventually able to say more than “wow”. Hank Phillippi Ryan was key in this, I’m guessing as a news reporter she is used to getting people back on solid ground.

Turns out Sisters in Crime were doing several panels at a stage on the exhibit floor. I skipped out on a session (shhh, I didn’t leave RDA, just another potentially exciting metadata-as-used-in-your-catalog session). The hour or so I spent listening to the writers was possibly the highlight of my time at the convention. Listening to writers discuss their process, their methods, their characters, etc. was fantastic. I so admire the talent and skill and stick-to-it-ness of writing and publishing. I have no such skill. Yes, I can write a blog post. Yes, I can put together a presentation for a class. But a complete plot, characters, etc.? Nope.  

One of the questions asked of the panelists was how do you represent personal beliefs or causes in your writing. And should you?  Ellery Adams (aka JB Stanley) discussed how breast cancer had struck her friend and as it is such a part of her life, she does include a character with the same devastating disease.  Donna Andrews said she finds more animal rescue themes creeping into her books (the Meg Lanslow mysteries). I was still in fan-girl mode so I didn’t speak up but I wanted to point out that Ms. Andrews has several themes in her ‘comical traditional mysteries’.  She has the theme of tolerance and of understanding. One of the minor characters enjoys roaming about in a gorilla costume – this is not discussed or considered weird or wrong. It is just is.  This is something I very much enjoy about her books. She doesn’t hit you over the head with things but presents them as just part of the world.

The panel moderator (Rosemary Harris, a fine author in her own right) pointed out to the audience that the groupings we saw on stage should help us in making recommendations to patrons. She said “If your patron has finished all of the Paula Holliday [Ms. Harris’ main protagonist] you might recommend GM Malliet or Ellen Crosby or Shelia Connolly, etc.” Brilliant! As the panel went on, it became glaringly apparent the writers held the librarians in high esteem.

I feel quite grateful I happened on this wonderful booth and subsequent talks. It gave me a much needed break from the intense cataloging track I was following. The authors I met were gracious, kind, and generous. They took the time to bring me into their world, introduce me around, and remind me one of the reasons why I became a librarian (no, seriously, I love to read).

Now if I can only remember the name of the gentleman writing a biography of Pinkerton…

Categories: books Tags:

Wales = Brilliant Librarians + Digitization

June 11, 2010 2 comments

Have you seen this “A Librarian Takes on Google Books“*? It is just brilliant on so many levels:

  • librarians not just recognizing the need but taking action
  • non-librarians seeing the worth of the project
  • purchasing and utilizing appropriate technology
  • quality AND quantity being considered and acted upon

Best of all? This near the end of the blog entry:

The librarian believes he has found a new cause for his profession, to give a secure home to digitized texts produced with the highest quality standards and available freely to all. “These are huge benefits,” he says, “and should be fought for by all of those who care about unimpeded public access to knowledge.”

I think Andrew Green is my new hero (then again, I haven’t yet seen what he is doing about metadata).

*Please note, the idea of the Google Book project is lovely.  Let’s get everything so everyone can access it.  The issues involved in such an endeavor are incredibly complex (from copyright to access to cost to quality and beyond).  I admire the ideal but am not enamored with the reality. For your edification, Library Journal has published a list of links regarding the topic. You can also just search for tons of for/against articles, blogs, etc.

Books are DEAD

March 30, 2010 3 comments

HAHAHAHA! I’ve been reading the NGC4Lib list and once again someone has declared the Death of Books (also of CDs, vinyl*, and anything else that is ‘stagnant’). 

To paraphrase Twain, reports of the death of books is greatly exaggerated. Books have been declared dead before. Anyone recall how microform was going TAKE OVER THE WORLD! We no longer need printed books, we have microform! Why, everyone will have their very own reader at home.  In fact, some universities developed their collections along these lines – collecting massive amounts of materials on microform only (I’m talking to you University of  Texas at Dallas) and had to struggle to catch up when microform did not actually take over the world.

Are printed books becoming less used in non-fiction and reference materials? Absolutely! Are they also beginning to cross over into the fiction world as e-Books? Sure enough! Are printed books obsolete? No. Is it possible in the distant future to have only e-Books? Sure. Is it going to happen in the next 5 to 10 years? I don’t think so.

Yes, the paradigm (ooh, look at the buzz word!) is shifting. Yes, more and more things are going online. Yes, there are e-Book-like things that are constantly updated with new information (MD Consult has had this for quite a while). It is lovely to have the instant access to the updated information (when the computers and networks are all playing nicely AND you have a subscription). [another topic to explore, the concept of renting information and owning information] 

But shifts have been happening for some time. Let’s look at the phenomena of print journals to e-Journals.  I recall predictions that print journals will no longer be published (Magazine are DEAD!) but they are still printed. Sure, some journals have transitioned to online only. Some are still walking the line of print and electronic. Some are “added value” electronic and regular ol’stagnant print. How many years has it been? CD-ROM databases were around nearly 20 years ago (eons in compuspeak). So. Journals are dead too, huh? Only e-Journals from now on! Uh huh.

Will print go away entirely? I doubt it, at least I doubt it will happen quite as fast and as finally as some on the NGC4Lib list are stating.  Just look at store catalogs and advertisements – they’ve been online for some time now but I still get postal mailings (a wee bit too much if you ask me). Until the majority of people out there have constant and reliable access to all things electronic and webbie, it just can’t happen. Where there is a market, there is a way.

I assume the argument is being used to emphasize the big ‘shift’ occurring. I mean, I guess the idea is to shock us into jumping up and down on the bandwagon and changing NOW BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!!! ALL WILL BE LOST! GONE FOREVER!! LOST I TELL YOU!! LOST! Er…sorry, hyperbole got the better of me, and of them.

*as to “vinyl” being dead, seems to me there are several bands (from Springstein to Erykah Badu to Lady Gaga),  releasing materials on vinyl and more people are collecting vinyl … at least, the purchase of vinyl is up and more stores (actual stores where you walk in and pick things up with your own hands) are carrying vinyl. Dead indeed.

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