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Presenting online

Online training, online demos, online EVERYTHING! It is cheaper and more cost effective, very true. But the success of such an event really comes down to the following:

1. Presenter.

2. Material.

3. Audience.

All three need to work together in a weird sort of synchronicity. The most vibrate presentation can be ruined by a dull speaker. The best speaker can be stymied by bad materials.  The audience can ruin or enhance the whole experience.

Presenters – practice if you have never presented in an online environment (WebEx, Connect, GotoMeeting, etc). Heck, practice if you are using a different program than usual, each one has neato cool stuff with different ways to use them. Gather your friends and have them log in. Record and listen to yourself. Ensure you know the program – how do you import slides, go to live websites, type text for the audience to see, etc.  Become familiar with the tools and tricks of the world you will inhabit.

Material – evaluate both the type of presentation and the audience before developing your materials.  Are you training or giving a sales/marketing pitch? Different approaches and materials will be needed. Also, check your online environment to ensure a smooth use of whatever you wish to use – does the system interact well with Prezi or does it freeze? Is there a preferred browser for websites? Find out before you spent time creating your presentation.

Audience – the key to everything. Who is going to be there? What do they expect? Is it a really big group? Is there a”live audience” with an online audience? Let’s spend some time here, mmkay?

With a mixed audience (live and online), the presenter needs to aware of the invisible audience. That microphone the techies so lovingly setup for you? It is really necessary for the online audience to hear you – even if the live audience can hear you just fine when you walk 20 feet away from the microphone. Be sure to engage the online group as well as the live folk, check the chat, repeat questions given in the live event into the microphone for the online audience.

Do you use a laser pointer? Great! You do realize the online audience has no idea you are pointing to anything, right? They cannot see the fancy cat toy burning a hole into the screen, so use your words to explain what you are doing.

In an online-only environment, the non-reaction and non-feedback can befuddle a presenter used to hearing or seeing reactions.  The presenter is generally alone in front of a computer, speaking into a headset and hoping the audience is hearing and engaging but the only way to know is if the audience types in chat, uses the online environment tools to clap or raise hands – worse is not knowing until the session ends and the evaluations are read (be sure to read these, it will help you present better in the future).

A great way to throw the presenter off-stride and to ensure the wrath of the rest of the audience is to keep the audience microphones live – ensuring all ambient noises echo thru the headsets and computer speakers across the land. It is wonderful to be able to ask questions in an online event. It is great to be able to speak rather than type into chat (although chat is really my fav). However. The dogs barking, the doorbells ringing, the potato chip crunching, and the general static sound of several microphones will distract the audience from whatever the presenter is presenting. The best presenter with an awesome presentation will fail when the audience cannot hear.

Hands up – how many have attended a session online where one of the audience members puts the session on hold and everyone in the room is overcome with hold music? Please tell me that wasn’t you. BTW, Presenters, when someone puts you on hold they cannot hear you ask, repeatedly, “will whoever put us on hold please take us off hold”? But is it pretty funny that you say it so many times… it’s right up there with “If you can’t hear me, please let me know”. Both statements I have heard from multiple online presenters in a variety of sessions. It never gets old. No. Really. Never.

Be the best you can be – learn to mute, practice before, learn your environment as well as your material. Now, go succeed!

Fun with Searching!

July 6, 2013 Leave a comment

Ever search random ideas, things or thoughts? Do it then watch the “ads” appear! A friend was over, we wondered if we could make pigs in a blanket without buying canned dough (you can) … now my “ads” all feature recipes, blankets, hot dog brand names, and (my favorite) actual piglets in blankets.

Awesome.

I did a blog a while back about cyber-stalking advertisements and it still amuses me how fun it can be. And now many major telecommunications groups (AT&T, Verizon, etc.) are planning to or are already selling your particular search history to others. Theoretically the “individual identification” is removed. Uh huh. Sure it is. No one could possible track me down … right Target?

Categories: humor, internet, privacy Tags:

The internets are dangerous

June 1, 2011 Leave a comment

Dangerously cool! And awesome! And, a little scary sometimes.

Show of hands, how many of you go to MedlinePlus (or your other favorite consumer health site) when you ‘suddenly’ develop a symptom and figure it must be The Start of Something Awful?  Say, perhaps, your feet are a wee bit swollen. Obviously something is wrong. It could not possibly be the 3 hour flight, a week of eating junky food followed by a 10 hour drive home. Certainly you now have Something Serious.

Off you go to look up Edema (psst, that is doctor-ese for ‘swollen feet’). In looking at the list of suspects, it’s obvious. You have kidney disease. Or maybe heart failure. After reviewing all the possibilities you come to the inescapable conclusion. Too much salt.

Hmm. Now to find how to get rid of it. You need a Diuretic. Being a new-age kind of person (and not wanting to pay to see a real doctor, plus the drug side affects look really icky), you head over to that other wealth of information, Goohoo (google/yahoo) to find some natural cures.

The Professional Librarian in you knows that Goohoo results are not always, well, truthful. So, using your ninja like research skills you quickly suss out that Dandelion is a pretty good choice. But … since it is not regulated, it is risky to just pick up any old dandelion pill.

Wait! What’s that? Watermelon and cucumber are natural diuretics? And they are on sale? And you love both?

Cured.

Categories: humor, internet Tags:

awesome techonology

May 22, 2011 1 comment

On and off I have been working on a post about technology.   I love new technology, am fascinated with the possibilities but at the same time I want to know how it will effect (and affect) things.

Remember the old PDA? The first run of these basically were just electronic address books – and the stylus was rather difficult to use (especially for those of us with less than stellar handwriting). I liked the idea but preferred my old handwritten, scribbled on, little black book.  I still do use that little black book (especially for physical addresses of friends/family) but I also my phone’s ability to retain phone numbers. Works for me but it does mean I can no longer remember phone numbers since I no longer dial from memory.

Then there is the downloadable music of today.  I’m told downloadable is replacing compact disc (which replaced the LP and cassettee…not entirely and not across the world).  This frustrates me. I love music and dislike the idea that I can only get some things by purchasing and downloading.  Well, except when you go to see live music of not-so-well-known bands. CD sales is where they can make their money, gigs don’t pay very much and CD (and tshirt and keychain, etc.) sales is where they can make some $$$. 

Oh! And books. Books are going away, d’ya know? Yes! It is said that no longer will we have paper, we will be a paperless society (I’ll pause here for your laughter as you look around your office).  Instead of purchasing a book or grabbing one from the library, you will purchase and download books to a device.  Seems very much like ‘renting’ to me – especially when Big Brother can reach across and delete from my device (referring to the Kindle/1984 phenomena – and ain’t it a kick what book that happened to?  Cue Rod Sterling).

I like owning a physical copy. Yes, it takes space but when my computer crashes and my hard drive backup is corrupt…I still have my CD and I can read by candlelight if power dies. I wish I had taken my own advice on physical copy when my phone decided I no longer needed to have any friends or contacts – which happened right after my computer decided to kick the bucket thus killing my phone backup.

 Then, of course, is the issue of access. I have ranted and ranted about this. NOT everyone can afford an MP3 player. What? They’re really cheap? Uh huh, so is milk but many still need food stamps or WIC. Oh! You’ll give everyone a player? Sweet. Now, how do they get the music to put on the ‘free’ player? Ah! Simply download it…on what? Can’t download in a public library. Can’t download when you do not own a computer OR have internet access. Oh and let’s not forget the  cost of electricity and/or batteries. It ain’t cheap.   Then there is the learning curve on how to do this…rant rant rant.

Wow – go off subject much? Yes. Yes I do. Point being technology is great, it really is but let us not forget everyone else. Let’s not build a society of information-rich and information-poor. Libraries can help fill this niche needed to provide all this wonderful technology to the masses.  And they do – quietly and without fanfare, libraries are out there helping people get what they need to succeed (as well as entertain).

*disclaimer, I do use downloads. I have downloaded music and books and all sorts of neato cool things. And I love it. But I do also love my physical copies for things I want to go over and over and over and over… I am not anti-technology. I am, though, pro-options.

Search, the Internet, and me

February 24, 2011 Leave a comment

On the NGC4LIB list, James Weinheimer posted a link to an article in the New York Times, The Dirty Little Secrets of Search.  The article both scares and fascinates me.  I sort of figured something was going on with search since I would get high hits for companies that had nothing to do (not really) with the object of my search. [and no, I shan’t name the company so it won’t get additional hits but it is big and has a red circular logo…]

Another article “How the Internet Gets Inside Us“, this from the New Yorker, was also posted on the NGC4LIB list but this time by B.J. Sloan. I think I am a Ever-Waser, based on the description in the article. I am cautiously optimistic. Actually, in general I am an optimistic person but with distinct paranoid tendencies.

Have you read the two articles? No? Go on. I’ll wait here [tapping foot], go on! Yes, they ARE long articles. Read.

OK. Why would I post these two articles together? You think they are unrelated? Au contraire mon frere! If the Internet is getting inside us AND if search is being so easily manipulated then… well then my paranoid self jumps aboard.

Search has been manipulated since Day 1. I remember when the “relevancy” ranking meant how many times a term appeared in the page (B.G. – Before Google).  Many sites added massive amounts of metadata to their pages to drive their ranking and get more hits. Then along came Google with their sneaky-cool algorithms.  Of  course spammers had to figure out how to work around that and they did. I think Google automatically ranks the domain extension as higher (such as a .gov would go higher than a .com) but then it relies on more complex computing, metadata, links, etc. to determine ranking.

I used to teach a class on how to read the URL and analyze the website to determine validity (at least, to get an idea if the site was credible). Few people really look at where they are getting the information, just so they get it.  This is no different from B.I. (Before Internet). My grandmother swore by the tabloids – after all, if they printed it then it must be true. The Internet via WWW carries on that tradition.

We now are seeing the phenomena of the Internet and World Wide Web. We can get to information (and misinformation) much more quickly than ever before.  We have the capability to instantly speak to someone in a completely different location – and share pictures, lectures, music, etc. practically at the speed of light. This is the change. It is faster. Human nature is the same. We still have evil. We still have manipulation. We still have beauty. We still have love. We can just access each other and the information faster.

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” said George Santayana [yes, I did google to find that-wait! no, I actually yahoo’ed]. Behind all the technology are human beings. Our nature has not changed drastically. Despite the new technology, the speed, etc. we are still we. We must be responsible enough to keep that grain of salt as we carry on using the glorious new techie tools for behind the tools lie humans [cue Dorothy and the Wizard behind the curtain]

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